Flight to Egypt

By Jeff Crisp

While a great deal of international attention has been given to the massive number of Syrian refugees who have crossed into Iraq, Jordan, Lebanon, and Turkey, it is often forgotten that many Syrians – up to 300,000 according to some estimates – have made the somewhat longer journey to the nearby state of Egypt.

Time for a Humanitarian Surge in CAR

By Mark Yarnell

As one drives around the devastated town of Bossangoa in northwest Central African Republic (CAR), it immediately becomes clear how the implosion of this country is being felt by ordinary citizens.

Bossangoa is the ancestral home of CAR’s former president, François Bozizé. The local population faced brutal attacks by the Seleka rebel group when they launched an offensive that brought down Bozizé in March 2013. 

Suffering & Displacement: The Human Cost of Climate Change

By Guest

On Saturday, February 22, scholars, humanitarian workers, activists, and religious leaders gathered at Washington’s National Cathedral to discuss why all of us should care about environmental sustainability and climate change and how can we help the people most affected.

Struggling to Respond in South Sudan, CAR

By Mark Yarnell

My colleague, Dara McLeod, and I are about to begin a mission to two neighboring countries in the center of Africa that are experiencing full-scale humanitarian crises: the Central African Republic (CAR) and South Sudan. Fighting inside each country has forced hundreds of thousands of people to flee their homes.

As Planning for Repatriation Ramps Up, Asylum Seekers Continue to Flee Somalia

By Mark Yarnell

At the same time that the Kenyan government is ramping up pressure for Somali refugees to return home, the UN Refugee Agency (UNHCR) has released new international protection considerations for people fleeing southern and central Somalia. The guidelines highlight the continued risks that these people face and stress the need for ongoing international protection of Somali asylum-seekers.

Trying to Be Safe

By Guest

I am sitting here in my room on a rainy Monday to write an essay about the challenges we as refugees face here in Nairobi. I just got back from school, and as I made my way home I held my breath until I reached my room. I am lucky I am here another day: safe and sound.

Seeking Safety in Uganda

By Guest

On December 16 last year, refugees began to flood across the border from South Sudan into Uganda as a result of an outbreak of violence in their country of origin. In the past two months the number of new arrivals has grown to roughly 66,000. They are being hosted in three areas: Adjumani, Arua, and Kiryandongo.    

Israeli Officials Use Asylum Debate to Divide and Distract

By Sarnata Reynolds

In January, tens of thousands of African asylum seekers and Israeli citizens demonstrated against the government's deeply flawed asylum policy. They railed against its refusal to consider applications for protection and its policy of indefinitely detaining asylum seekers without charge or cause. Thousands of asylum seekers walked out of their jobs in restaurants, hotels, and other businesses as a way of demonstrating their concrete value to Israeli society. Some of those same businesses even provided food to the demonstrators in a show of support.

South Sudan: Coming Apart at the Seams

By Eileen Shields-West

This post originally appeared at Politix.

It was unbelievably festive on the day, July 9, 2011, that South Sudan became the world's newest independent country. From the United States, President Barack Obama sent a message that "the map of the world has been redrawn," and South Sudan's popularly-elected leader, Salva Kiir, declared that "the eyes of the world are on us now."

Between “Voluntary Repatriation” and Constructive Refoulement: The Case of Asylum Seekers in Israel

By Guest
On the 16th of September 2013, the Israeli High Court of Justice invalidated the Prevention of Infiltration Act (Amendment no. 3), that allowed the incarceration of asylum seekers from Africa for up to three years. During the months following the decision, while authorities were working exceptionally slowly to release asylum seekers from prison, the Israeli Knesset started working on a new bill to replace the invalidated act. And in less than a month, its swift legislation process was over. 
Syndicate content