Make No Mistake: Mali’s Displacement Crisis Isn’t Over

By Michelle Brown

This post originally appeared at UN Dispatch.

More than a year ago, families fled northern Mali in droves after insurgents there routed Malian forces. While some of those families became refugees in nearby countries, most simply fled to the country’s south.

Syria’s Refugees: Humanitarianism and Its Limits

By Jeff Crisp

In less than three years, the Syrian refugee population has become the largest in the world, surpassing the number of people who have been forced to flee longstanding conflicts such as those in Afghanistan, Somalia, and Sudan.

Haiti’s Uphill Battle: Developing Countries Struggle with Natural Disasters

By Guest

It’s been over three years since the earthquake in Haiti devastated the capital Port-au-Prince, killing an estimated 230,000 people and leaving 1.2 million homeless.

Mali: On the Road to Recovery?

By Michelle Brown

In the two months since Mali elected a new president, cautious optimism has prevailed throughout the country. The French military intervention succeeded in driving out Al Qaeda-linked insurgents from the north and has paved the way for the central government to reestablish its authority throughout the country. The UN Stabilization Mission in Mali (MINUSMA) has begun the process of deploying peacekeepers, although the mission won’t be fully operational until the end of the year.

Five Issues to Watch in South Sudan

By Caelin Briggs

As we start the month of October, we thought it would be good to take stock of the recent developments in South Sudan, and to highlight some of the issues RI will be watching over the coming months.

Malian Refugees in Desperate State After UN Halts Services

By Marcy Hersh

This post originally appeared at SahelNOW.

Mbera is the biggest refugee camp that you've never heard of. With a population of more than 70,000 refugees, Mbera is the sixth largest camp in the world. It is located in a remote area of Mauritania near the border with Mali, and since early 2012, a mix of Tuareg and Arab refugees from northern Mali have fled across the border into this highly arid region.

With Another Crisis Looming, Can the UN Finally Deliver for the Sahel?

By Alice Thomas

Despite forecasts indicating a good harvest this fall, millions of vulnerable people across West Africa’s Sahel region will not have enough food to eat again this year. Many are still reeling from 2011-12, when poor rains and high food prices left 18 million people without sufficient food and a million children at risk of starvation.

What's in a Speech? Obama at the UN

By Michelle Brown

With midtown Manhattan at a virtual standstill, the annual UN General Assembly speeches, side meetings, and high-level events have begun. But can this grand event produce solutions to the world’s most pressing problems?

Syria, Egypt, and the Syrians in Egypt

By Daryl Grisgraber

Since last month’s chemical weapons attack, Syria has chased the coup and chaos in Egypt off the front pages. Nevertheless, both crises continue to shake the social and political foundation of the Middle East. This has been true, on and off, since early 2011. But now the two countries’ crises are converging in a worrying new trend: the flow of Syrian refugees into – and then out of – Egypt.

The People on the Other Side of the Wall

By Garrett Bradford

My colleague, Mark Yarnell, and I were recently in Mogadishu, Somalia. Anyone visiting Mogadishu can see the new construction and other evidence of money flowing back into this city, which was devastated by years of conflict. As Mark and I drove around, we also saw the downside of these changes. Many sites where internally displaced people (IDPs) were living a year ago had since been cleared by private landowners and the government.

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